07TBILISI2800, INTERIM TIP ASSESSMENT FOR GEORGIA

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Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
07TBILISI2800 2007-11-09 15:51 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED Embassy Tbilisi

VZCZCXRO3144
PP RUEHAG RUEHAST RUEHDA RUEHDBU RUEHDF RUEHFL RUEHIK RUEHKW RUEHLA
RUEHLN RUEHLZ RUEHPOD RUEHROV RUEHSR RUEHVK RUEHYG
DE RUEHSI #2800/01 3131551
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 091551Z NOV 07
FM AMEMBASSY TBILISI
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 8164
INFO RUEHZL/EUROPEAN POLITICAL COLLECTIVE

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 TBILISI 002800 
 
SIPDIS 
 
SIPDIS 
 
DEPT FOR EUR/PGI, G-ACBLANK,G/TIP, AND EUR/CARC 
 
E.O. 12958: N/A 
TAGS: PHUM PGOV PREL SMIG KCRM KWMN GG
SUBJECT: INTERIM TIP ASSESSMENT FOR GEORGIA 
 
REF: SECSTATE 146300 
 
1. (U) Summary: This interim assessment (reftel) covers 
Georgia's continuing strides against trafficking-in-persons 
(A-TIP) since April, 2007.  Georgia aggressively investigates 
and prosecutes human traffickers.  The country's proactive 
identification of TIP victims is improving, thanks to more 
A-TIP staff and additional training.  The National Referral 
Mechanism (NRM) was consistently implemented in every TIP 
case identified in the reporting cycle.  The National 
Strategy for Rehabilitation and Reintegration (SRR) of TIP 
victims, adopted in July 2007, is the natural extension to 
the NRM.  It ensures follow-on service to TIP victims through 
the State Fund to Protect and Aid TIP victims.  The Georgian 
government has increased its A-TIP capabilities, budget, and 
victim assistance programs.  It has fully maintained its 
excellent cooperation with A-TIP NGOs and its extremely 
active TIP prevention campaign.  End Summary. 
 
2. (U) On November 7, the Prosecutor General's (PG) office 
reported investigations into 16 possible TIP cases since 
April 1.  Of these, 11 cases allegedly involve internal 
trafficking (six involve the sale of children for adoption, 
three labor exploitation, and two sexual exploitation.) 
Seven of the 16 cases involve external trafficking, mainly 
for sexual exploitation in Turkey.  These investigations are 
ongoing.  Since April 1, 13 persons were being detained and 
charged by the PG for TIP crimes (cases were initiated in 
previous year/s.)  In the 9 cases submitted to court, 12 
judgments were handed down.  The average sentence given was 
13-14 years in prison.  Additionally, 17 Mutual Legal 
Assistance Requests for TIP investigations have been 
processed (countries include Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and 
Ukraine.)  In May, Georgia's Parliament enacted a new law 
criminalizing the use of services of a TIP victim. 
 
3. (U) Georgia has significantly increased its efforts to 
proactively identify TIP victims.  Four new Special 
Operations Department (SOD) officers were appointed to the 
A-TIP unit.  The Unit's 32 members are located throughout the 
country.  They actively research and investigate possible TIP 
activity/information (incl. overseas employment ads.)  All 
new police recruits undergo basic A-TIP training in the 
police academy.  Border Police and SOD undergo advanced 
training.  UNODC, NATO-sponsored Turkish trainers, 
WorldVision Georgia, ABA-CEELI and other organizations have 
provided specialized A-TIP training (incl. victim/witness 
protection) to more than 100 policemen, SOD officers, border 
guards, and prosecutors since April 1.  In a "train the 
trainers" program in December, IOM will teach advanced TIP 
victim interviewing and identification techniques to 30 
prosecutors and policemen.  More and more of Georgia's peace 
officers are watching out for TIP, raising awareness, and 
relaying suspicious activity to SOD investigators.  Several 
border checkpoints are being built, or refurbished, which 
will also strengthen screening for potential TIP victims. 
 
4. (U) The NRM is overseen by the Interagency Coordination 
Council (ICC) to combat TIP.  The ICC maintains two mobile 
groups to meet and interview alleged TIP victims anywhere in 
Georgia, at any time.  The NRM is enacted every time a TIP 
crime is investigated by law enforcement or a referral is 
made to the State Fund to Protect and Aid TIP Victims (i.e. 
by a third-party.)  It makes no difference if the TIP victim 
cooperates with a criminal investigation or not.  Either the 
SOD or the ICC's Permanent Group can grant "statutory" TIP 
victim status, based on investigations or the mobile group's 
findings.  This status provides the victim access to all 
State Fund services.  In the 16 TIP cases since April 1, 19 
victims have been granted status.  Of these, 15 have chosen 
to cooperate in investigations.  In this period, the mobile 
group has met nine times with 10 persons.  The new SRR has 
normalized how the State Fund provides services for TIP 
victims.  Now, victims can choose what assistance they need 
(medical, shelter, financial, legal, etc.), and it is readily 
provided.  The State Fund works consistently with NGOs to 
ensure even non-statutory victims receive assistance.  To 
expand the NRM's capabilities, Georgia spent USD 30,600 to 
open a second TIP victim shelter in September in Tbilisi. 
Georgia's shelters can now accommodate up to 20 victims, in 
Eastern and Western Georgia.  Currently, 8 TIP victims and 
two (non-statutory) children are housed in the shelters.  The 
SOD, Public Defender, and numerous NGOs know how to use the 
NRM. 
 
5. (U) Georgia raised the State Fund's budget to USD 180,000 
this year, and will raise it by 50 percent in 2008.  The ICC 
maintains a TIP victim hotline throughout the country and 
distributes A-TIP pamphlets with passports and at bord
er 
crossings.  High school curricula include TIP awareness 
training.  In conjunction with NGOs, the ICC kicked off a new 
 
TBILISI 00002800  002 OF 002 
 
 
PSA campaign and has sponsored numerous A-TIP TV and radio 
programs.  They have conducted multiple public awareness 
events, including two at local universities.  The ICC 
continues to work together with numerous other NGOs and 
agencies, including Georgian Young Lawyers Association, IOM, 
IOL, OSCE, WorldVision, and the Anti-Violence Network. 
TEFFT

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